Reiner April 2012 : Page 160

FR OM OUR CORPORA TE P A R TNERS MERIAL Top NRHA Professional knows the value of preventing equine stomach ulcers. “What we don’t want is to have a promising young horse on the sidelines,” Crawford says. “I’m convinced ULCERGARD helps keep them in the arena.” op competitor and trainer Todd Crawford, one of NRHA’s elite NRHA Professionals, and the number one money-earning reined cow horse rider of all time, knows a thing or two about young horses and the importance of pre-ventive health care. Specializing in preparing horses for both reining and reined cow horse fu-turities, he takes on between 10 and 15 two-year-old prospects each year at his Blanchard, Oklahoma, facility. In the national and international spotlight for more than two decades, Crawford, besides being over the $2 million rider mark in reined cow horse earnings, has amassed an impressive list of achievements that drives horse owners and riders to his training program. In 2000, he was the United States Equestrian Team’s (USET) Fes-tival of Champions Reining Gold and Silver medalist, and in 2004 he earned Gold in the in-augural FEI World Reining Masters Finals. Craw-ford is also a perennial finalist in NRHA’s major events. He was the American Quarter Horse Asso-ciation’s (AQHA) Professional Horseman of the Year in 2000 as well. Combined, Crawford and his clients have won more than three dozen World Championships in three separate per-formance horse associations: National Reining Horse Association (NRHA), National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) and AQHA. What has made Crawford and his clients so successful? His recipe includes equal parts fam-ily support, talent, hard work and good all-around horsemanship. “We expect a lot out of our horses,” Crawford says. “If they aren’t feeling their best, then they can’t perform at their best.” Crawford thinks this is especially true of the T young horses in his program. “We’re starting with promising two-year-olds that don’t know any-thing and throwing a whole lot of things at them,” he says. “The training aspect is just one part of the big picture. We’re also hauling them to new places, changing their schedule and tak-ing them away from their buddies. It is a lot for them to handle.” Some navigate through the new stressors better than others, according to Crawford. “With the futurity horses, you have to find out a little by trial and error which ones are going to haul, eat and adjust well to the show environment,” he says. “Those who don’t handle it well are at risk of developing health problems, including equine stomach ulcers,” he says. “I know if I had an upset stomach, I wouldn’t be able to do my job.” To help prevent the horses in his care from developing equine stomach ulcers, Crawford uses ULCERGARD® (omeprazole), the only prod-uct proven and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) specifically for preventing stomach ulcers in healthy horses. 1* April Knud-son, DVM, equine specialist for Merial’s Large An-imal Veterinary Services, says the futurity horses Crawford trains can be particularly susceptible to ulcers. “Horses are very sensitive. Anytime you take them out of their normal routine and envi-ronment, you can be setting the stage for stom-ach ulcers,” she says. “Young, inexperienced horses that are being asked to perform at high levels might be even more susceptible simply be-cause everything is new to them. They can even appear to be handling the new stressors, but de-velop ulcers anyway.”

Merial

The value of preventing equine stomach ulcers.

Top competitor and trainer Todd Crawford, one of NRHA's elite NRHA Professionals, and the number one money-earning reined cow horse rider of all time, knows a thing or two about young horses and the importance of preventive health care. Specializing in preparing horses for both reining and reined cow horse futurities, he takes on between 10 and 15 two-year-old prospects each year at his Blanchard, Oklahoma, facility.

In the national and international spotlight for more than two decades, Crawford, besides being over the $2 million rider mark in reined cow horse earnings, has amassed an impressive list of achievements that drives horse owners and riders to his training program. In 2000, he was the United States Equestrian Team's (USET) Festival of Champions Reining Gold and Silver medalist, and in 2004 he earned Gold in the inaugural FEI World Reining Masters Finals. Crawford is also a perennial finalist in NRHA's major events. He was the American Quarter Horse Association's (AQHA) Professional Horseman of the Year in 2000 as well. Combined, Crawford and his clients have won more than three dozen World Championships in three separate performance horse associations: National Reining Horse Association (NRHA), National Reined Cow Horse Association (NRCHA) and AQHA.

What has made Crawford and his clients so successful? His recipe includes equal parts family support, talent, hard work and good all-around horsemanship. "We expect a lot out of our horses," Crawford says. "If they aren't feeling their best, then they can't perform at their best."

Crawford thinks this is especially true of the young horses in his program. "We're starting with promising two-year-olds that don't know anything and throwing a whole lot of things at them," he says. "The training aspect is just one part of the big picture. We're also hauling them to new places, changing their schedule and taking them away from their buddies. It is a lot for them to handle."

Some navigate through the new stressors better than others, according to Crawford. "With the futurity horses, you have to find out a little by trial and error which ones are going to haul, eat and adjust well to the show environment," he says. "Those who don't handle it well are at risk of developing health problems, including equine stomach ulcers," he says. "I know if I had an upset stomach, I wouldn't be able to do my job."

To help prevent the horses in his care from developing equine stomach ulcers, Crawford uses ULCERGARD® (omeprazole), the only product proven and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) specifically for preventing stomach ulcers in healthy horses.1* April Knudson, DVM, equine specialist for Merial's Large Animal Veterinary Services, says the futurity horses Crawford trains can be particularly susceptible to ulcers. "Horses are very sensitive. Anytime you take them out of their normal routine and environment, you can be setting the stage for stomach ulcers," she says. "Young, inexperienced horses that are being asked to perform at high levels might be even more susceptible simply because everything is new to them. They can even appear to be handling the new stressors, but develop ulcers anyway."

Clinical information confirms Dr. Knudson's belief. In gastric endoscopy events sponsored by Merial over the past four years, the results have proven stomach ulcers are a threat to all breeds and disciplines. In fact, of the cutting horses scoped, 69 percent were found to have ulcers while 76 percent of the reining horses were diagnosed with stomach ulcers.3

The active ingredient in ULCERGARD, omeprazole, reduces acid production by blocking the stomach's acid pump. In one study, ULCERGARD prevented stomach ulcers in 82 percent of horses when given once daily, while 86 percent of untreated horses developed stomach ulcers.4

"We know horse owners want the best for their horses," says Dr. Knudson. "That's why they should beware of products making claims that are not backed by scientifically valid research and that are not FDA-approved."

ULCERGARD, which has been proven to help prevent equine stomach ulcers,4 is a non-prescription medication available from veterinarians and can be used while horses continue their regular training activities. That's an important benefit to trainers like Crawford. "What we don't want is to have a promising young horse on the sidelines," he says. "I'm convinced ULCERGARD helps keep them in the arena." IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ULCERGARD can be used in horses that weigh at least 600 pounds. Safety in pregnant mares has not been determined.

"What we don't want is to have a promising young horse on the sidelines," Crawford says. "I'm convinced ULCERGARD helps keep them in the arena."

ABOUT MERIAL

Merial is a world-leading, innovation-driven animal health company, providing a comprehensive range of products to enhance the health, well-being and performance of a wide range of animals. Merial employs approximately 5,600 people and operates in more than 150 countries worldwide. Its 2011 sales were more than $2.8 billion. Merial is a Sanofi company.

*When administered for eight or 28 days, ULCERGARD is proven to effectively prevent stomach ulcers in horses exposed to stressful conditions.

1ULCERGARD product label.

2Mitchell, RD. Prevalence of gastric ulcers in hunter/jumper and dressage horses evaluated for poor performance. Association for Equine Sports Medicine, September 2001.

3Data on file at Merial.

4White GW, et al. Prevention of occurrence and recurrence of gastric ulcers in horses by treatment with omeprazole at 1 mg/kg/day. In Proceedings: 49th Annual Convention of the American Association of Equine Practitioners,2003:220-221.

®ULCERGARD is a registered trademark of Merial Limited. ©2012 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. EQUIUGD1203 (01/12)

Read the full article at http://digitaleditions.sheridan.com/article/Merial/1012058/105154/article.html.

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