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Edible Ojai Ventura Winter 2014 : Page 13

CHECK THIS OUT DOUGH DOCKER BEATS BUBBLES hen we make pizza, we fuss over the dough in our quest for the ultimate crust. Th anks to a young friend who makes pizza for income and whose parents hold a serious weekly pizza night in their home kitchen, we were introduced to a dough docker. Bakers use dough dockers to help eliminate air pockets that might build up from kneading the dough. In the case of pizza, rolling the formed pizza dough repeatedly with a docker prevents over-rising and blistering as it cooks. W While the commercial-grade docker shown is built for hardcore use, with stainless steel handle and pins embedded into a heavy polycarbon-ate barrel, it costs only $20–$25 at restaurant supply companies and online. Sur La Table (SurLaTable.com) in Th ousand Oaks has an all-resin model that costs about $12. —Ron Wallace MUST BE 21 MILLÉSIMÉ CELLARS BRINGS OLD WORLD TO CAMARILLO sip of Millésimé Cellars’ 2009 Lumiere Du Fleur reveals luscious blackberries, tobacco leaves, black pepper, boysenberries, toasted hazelnuts, cocoa and dark coff ee beans. It’s a Right-Bank Style Bordeaux blend of 53% Merlot, 41% Cabernet Franc and 6% Cabernet Sauvignon, mak-ing this a full-bodied wine with medium tannins. Vintage to vintage, the Camarillo winery’s unfi ltered blend has Old World style, great richness and amazing layers of depth, says owner and winemaker Brittany Rice. Rice, who’s also a culinary school graduate, says the wine pairs well with smoky and spicy foods, like grilled or slow-cooked vegetables seasoned with chipotle peppers, smoked paprika, garlic, basil and cilantro. Or match it with peppered steak, roasted lamb or pasta tossed with a spicy tomato sauce. It’s also lovely with Italian sausage or yellow or red Indian curries, potatoes, pineapple and fennel. For fun, we asked Rice if the 2009 “Lumiere Du Fleur” was an animal, what it would be: “Hands-down, a zebronkey,” she says. “A zebronkey tricks your eyes because it’s unusual, it has complex chemistry and is native to its particular place of origin, as is the Lumiere Du Fleur. It tricks your palate with its unusual richness and has complex layers within its chemistry and shows its true native characters with its true rich Bordeaux Right Bank balance.” For more info, visit MillesimeCellars.com. EdibleVenturaCounty.com A Photo courtesy of Millésimé Cellars winter 2014 13

Check This Out

By Ron Wallace

DOUGH DOCKER BEATS BUBBLES

When we make pizza, we fuss over the dough in our quest for the ultimate crust. Thanks to a young friend who makes pizza for income and whose parents hold a serious weekly pizza night in their home kitchen, we were introduced to a dough docker.

Bakers use dough dockers to help eliminate air pockets that might build up from kneading the dough. In the case of pizza, rolling the formed pizza dough repeatedly with a docker prevents over-rising and blistering as it cooks.

While the commercial-grade docker shown is built for hardcore use, with stainless steel handle and pins embedded into a heavy polycarbonate barrel, it costs only $20–$25 at restaurant supply companies and online. Sur La Table (SurLaTable.com) in Thousand Oaks has an allresin model that costs about $12.

–Ron Wallace

Read the full article at http://digitaleditions.sheridan.com/article/Check+This+Out/1601830/190824/article.html.

Must Be 21

MILLÉSIMÉ CELLARS BRINGS OLD WORLD TO CAMARILLO

A sip of Millésimé Cellars' 2009 Lumiere Du Fleur reveals luscious blackberries, tobacco leaves, black pepper, boysenberries, toasted hazelnuts, cocoa and dark coffee beans. It's a Right-Bank Style Bordeaux blend of 53% Merlot, 41% Cabernet Franc and 6% Cabernet Sauvignon, making this a full-bodied wine with medium tannins.

Vintage to vintage, the Camarillo winery's unfiltered blend has Old World style, great richness and amazing layers of depth, says owner and winemaker Brittany Rice.

Rice, who's also a culinary school graduate, says the wine pairs well with smoky and spicy foods, like grilled or slow-cooked vegetables seasoned with chipotle peppers, smoked paprika, garlic, basil and cilantro. Or match it with peppered steak, roasted lamb or pasta tossed with a spicy tomato sauce. It's also lovely with Italian sausage or yellow or red Indian curries, potatoes, pineapple and fennel.

For fun, we asked Rice if the 2009 "Lumiere Du Fleur" was an animal, what it would be: "Handsdown, a zebronkey," she says. "A zebronkey tricks your eyes because it's unusual, it has complex chemistry and is native to its particular place of origin, as is the Lumiere Du Fleur. It tricks your palate with its unusual richness and has complex layers within its chemistry and shows its true native characters with its true rich Bordeaux Right Bank balance."

For more info, visit MillesimeCellars.com.

Read the full article at http://digitaleditions.sheridan.com/article/Must+Be+21/1601833/190824/article.html.

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